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Anonymous December 27, 2021

I am a single teacher. My entire life, I knew that I wanted to be a teacher, and I am a very talented teacher. However, I want to support a husband in Kollel, and as my parents are both in Chinuch themselves, they cannot afford to support me at all. My parents are pushing me to get a degree so that I can be "practical" and get a real job, which will allow me to support a husband in Kollel. Of course everything comes from Hashem, and I am ready to rely on him to support me with or without a higher salary, but now Kibbud Av V'Eim comes into the picture as well. It is very hard to earn a degree without compromising on my values, but it is either that or going against my parents' wishes as the situation stands now. On top of that is the issue of top learners refusing to consider girls in Chinuch because of the difficulty (or more accurately impossibility) of making do on such a tiny salary. I work full time plus, investing my entire self into my girls, and not only is the salary pitiful and demeaning, I am not appreciated, or at least not shown that I am appreciated. I am constantly being asked to do more for the school, while the school makes changes that make it harder for me to do the job I have actually been hired to do, which is to teach our precious Yiddishe Neshamos! Our girls need good teachers, and Hashem has bentched me with the Kochos to be an excellent one. Should I and all of my potential students lose out because my parents are in Chinuch and I am not wealthy enough to have the "luxury" of teaching?!?! Is this what we want for our Chinuch Habanos?!?!

Anonymous December 27, 2021

Here's a point that has not been discussed much: I have been teaching for over a decade and still make less than $20 k a year. My husband is in kollel and gives shiurim. We don't get even the slightest discount for tuition(we send our children to a different school)-we were told that since the tuition payments don't cover the school's budget they don't give any discount even to kollel couples. I find it frustrating since it was not always like this, and i know others in similar positions who were told the same thing. Perhaps schools should automatically give a discount to parents in chinuch??!

Shifra Gold December 21, 2021

In a teacher's meeting, I once asked our speaker, a leading mechanech, this question of why we get paid so little, get appreciated so little, and get faced with so much criticism. He answered that the only reason is the Yetzer Hara. He said the field of chinuch is so valuable and special that everyone would run to teach and inspire the next generation. To keep our best minds organizing transactions and entering data, the Yetzer Hara created low salaries and low appreciation levels in the most important field of all.

Debbie December 21, 2021

It always hurt me that teachers get paid so little when as a parent I pay so much tuition for my children. Where is all the money going?

Anonymous December 17, 2021

The podcast was superb! It's important for the public to hear WHY to value the teachers too. a) You want teachers for YOUR children that have the experience pick up on issues, GUIDE your children how to navigate the world & teachers that can PROTECT them from the world today. b) As salaries are so low, many teachers are working at additional jobs- preventing them from helping your child because they are just stretched too thinly. c) The lack of respect is filtering down to the children. Just look at the classoom decorum today. They feel the way the adults do/act.

Anonymous December 15, 2021

I've been teaching high school for 7 years. But honestly, as classroom discipline goes downhill so does the satisfaction of the job. I am currently facing a big decision regarding next year. No paid sick or vacation days, no office benefits, always "taking work home"... Is it really worth it?

Anonymous December 15, 2021

In my experience I have seen parents take progressively less responsibility for the chinuch of their children and expect more and more from mechanchim. Combine that with the constantly increasing negative influences of the outside world which mechanchim have to contend with and what is expected of mechanchim by many stakeholders becomes extremely difficult to satisfy.

Simi Feigen December 15, 2021

This is my 36th year teaching BH! Years ago, my salary went towards a discounted tuition for my children. There were years that I taught as a chessed for the school. Even after completing my Masters degree and teaching High School level general studies, staying up nights grading and preparing lessons, my salary always remained $50 an hour! There should be fair salary scales for seasoned teachers as myself who deserve better pay after all these years of being mechanech over a thousand students and counting!

Anonymous December 12, 2021

The sipuk that I get from teaching is unparalleled. I taught before I got married, put away every penny and lived very simply off of it for 3 years. At that point we had no choice but for my husband to get a job. I got a different job and returned to teaching when finances and my children's schedule allowed it. Now that I am in the classroom, I don't know how I managed without this life gift.

Anonymous December 11, 2021

Since I am not the primary breadwinner, I have been able to remain in chinuch for over 30 years. I am currently a principal for grades 1-4 in a large school that is challenged by a lot of turnover each year. I am forced to hire young, inexperienced girls because of the low starting salary I can offer. However, I have tremendous sipuk from coaching and training those new teachers who are idealistic and energetic and not yet disillusioned. Surprisingly, they do a great job! They, in turn, appreciate the on the job training they get, along with prepared units of study that they are spared from preparing from scratch. It's a mutually beneficial arrangement and our students are the winners.

Anonymous December 09, 2021

After watching the powerful short video presented at the top of this page, I cannot be silent when I see that a teacher's starting salary is 12,500. I've heard numbers like 12,000, 10,000 and even an unbearable 9,000! (This in a school where teachers are given the attitude of "You should be thanking us for hiring you.")

Anonymous December 08, 2021

My mother was a teacher and I have been teaching for 25+ years. I am so grateful for the opportunity that I have each day to make a difference in the lives of my young students. I have even had the nachas of teaching my students' daughters. While I greatly enjoy my job, it is definitely under appreciated by others as well as underpaid. My daughters, a few of whom would likely be very capable and talented Moros, have no interest in going into chinuch for that reason. Over the years, I am seeing less girls looking for teaching positions, and school years beginning with unfilled positions. When desperate, a school will take whoever they can find- is that what we really want for the next generation? A constantly revolving door of young inexperienced Moros who are just taking the job as a part time position that can be done (sort of) while completing their degree in order to get a "real" and better paying, less demanding job?

Anonymous December 07, 2021

I'm reading these comments and I can't help but compare teaching to other jobs. In an office, the work is mind-numbing and tedious. There is no satisfaction that you are doing anything to improve the world. Office workers don't receive appreciation. On the other hand, teachers have enjoyable, stimulating days. Schools are fun places to be! Moros have an automatic connection to ruchniyus, parsha, Yomim Tovim, etc., just by being in the environment and also through the lessons they teach. You are home when your kids are home (something I would have appreciated today--my kids had Chanuka break and I had to take off from work and still stay on top of my tasks). There are so many reasons that teaching is an unbelievably amazing occupation for a Jewish mother. MUCH MUCH BETTER THAN ANY OFFICE JOB. It would be fair if they could be paid for hours they put in at night, though. Otherwise, the numbers I'm hearing seem pretty comparable to my (fairly decent) hourly salary in an office.

Anonymous December 05, 2021

I'm a 23 year old girl who had the greatest of intentions to teach long term. I got my BA in education and headed off to my classroom. Sadly, my teaching stint didn't last very long... After two years of teaching fourth grade, I am going back to school for my MSW. Two main points influenced this decision. First of all it was extremely difficult. If I may say so myself, I was a fantastic teacher and maintained a disciplined and enjoyable classroom. But the exorbitant amount of time and energy needed just to keep my classroom a safe, healthy, and behaving environment was extremely taxing on my single life, let alone what it would be like on my married life... The second and equally frustrating reason that I left teaching was the unlivable salary. First of all, I knew first-hand that married teachers in the same or lesser positions were getting paid more than me by virtue of the sheitels on their heads. But regardless I did not feel responsible going into a marriage be"zH wanting to marry a learning boy and bringing home the paycheck I'd been receiving. If you at this conference can do anything to increase the support both practically and financially for the classroom teachers, I and the many other girls who left teaching for other professions might have a reason to rejoin the invaluable field of chinuch habanos. Until then, I'll be working towards my degree in social work to continue to help our precious children, albeit in a more financially rewarding environment. Thank you for all you do and hatzlacha going further.

Golda Antokol December 05, 2021

Maybe we can adopt the practice of many out-of-town schools where teachers can teach a full day and some classes have secular studies in the morning and Jewish Studies in the afternoon. This will give the teachers the opportunity to earn double the money and principals will need to hire less teachers. I think parents would prefer a star Morah in the afternoon then a mediocre Morah in the morning for their child.

Anonymous December 04, 2021

I am a 3rd generation mechanech/principal who has been a 1st grade rebbe for almost 20 years and is now a principal in the same school's middle school. Passion comes from one's own growth. Our rebbeim and moros need to be growing and learning each day and be mission driven. This comes from within, and their own yeshiva and bais yaakov upbringing. Those of us who were given a mandate to understand, dive deep into our learning and be introspective will be on fire, those who were excellent students but don't find their unique place in yiddishkeit won't convey that passion. My two decades in chinuch as well as my upbringing have shown that most of our mechanichim and mechnachos are passionate and driven, we need to remove other distractions from them like having to work multiple jobs to make a living wage. With all due respect to the hours and vacation schedule, including the summer, the precious cargo we handle, the standard we are held to, and the energy it takes to inspire far outweighs the abbreviated work schedule. Lawyers get paid $100s of dollars an hour for protecting one's assets, should a protector of our children\'s neshamos be considered any less choshuv or does our money speak louder than our values?

Anonymous December 02, 2021

I teach limudei kodesh in a girls school. I love teaching and I love giving over warmth and care to my students. I am passionate about the subjects I teach and it is my dream to teach for the rest of my life! However, I also hope to support a husband in kollel for as long as I could. With the salary I make now, making ends meet will be really difficult. This is the reason that I am in college now. Eventually, when teaching becomes impossible, I will have to go out and work in an office and get a nice salary, in order to support my husband's learning. This is such a shame, because I really love teaching and would love to continue teaching for the rest of my life. If the salaries of teachers would be raised, it would make it way easier for people to stay in the field.

Anonymous December 02, 2021

No. For two years, I taught, with my second year of teaching being in shana rishona. To say I was underpaid for my hard work is an understatement. My husband could not understand why I invested so much time in a job that paid so little - I needed to hav a second job. This year I do something else (one job BH) and The work is easier and I get paid more. I have more time for my husband and new child as well. Teaching can only be worth it if the schools pay their teachers a salary that reflects the importance of their job! Goes with out saying I was an idealistic girl that was passionate about teaching. I did a fabulous job in my classroom and gained a lot, but I had to be realistic about making it work with my husband learning - and that is besides the help my parents give. So while I gave up the privilege of teaching girls, I gained time for my family and harchavas hadas. And unfortunately teachers rooms today are comprised of young girls That have little experience. Most leave at a certain point because of financial reasons and there is a quick turnover rate There are fewer and fewer older experiences morahs teaching our girls.

Anonymous December 02, 2021

BH it's amazing how much Tzedaka is being distributed these days by Klal Yisroel. But unfortunately our Mosdos HaTorah aren;t receiving most of these funds, they are usually forgotten or outdated causes.Let's not forget, we depend on these schools to build Klal Yisroel , to be mechanech our children, to teach them how to learn, daven, midos tovos,etc. This should be the #1 cause!!! Many other Tzedokos and organizations might sound more exciting . Our children and their future come first. If we take of our Mosdos Hachinuch and our mechanchim they will be able to give our kids a proper chinuch and many other causes and organizations won't be needed. Rabonim, Donor's & Askonim let's wake up Klal Yisroel. A fund should be set up to encourage & help our schools increase the salaries of our dear mechanchim & mechanachos. (In Lakewood the askonim raised millions to increase kollel checks) What's with our children's future? Who will get involved?

Anonymous December 01, 2021

Its never only about the salary, though yes, it should definitely be increased. Its about how a Morah is valued by the administration and society. When I first started teaching, over 25 years ago, there was pride in being a teacher. Mitzva notes were full of thanks and cute anecdotes that the child repeated at home. Hanhala was sincerly interested in curriculum and how the children where doing. Planbooks were given feedback. Nowadays a bagful of Chanuka projects, and a child well prepared for the chag, elicited just one thank you note out of a class of 20 - just one parent cared enough about her child's chinuch and the Morah behind it to write a note? The PTA collects 10$ per a Morah for a Chanuka tip, I know with large families it adds up and living on a very limited budget myself I understand that finances are tight, but, $10 for teaching their preschool son 7 hours a day and then spending hours in the evening on prep and parent-teacher communication all year long? From families that all manage to tip the delivery guy $2 on a weekly basis, adding up to $100, for shlepping their delivery box? Its like a slap in our face. And Hanhala, being preoccupied with making sure that we're complying with government requirements so that they don't loose 3k, UPK or headstart funding, no longer give Morahs the feedback, PD and thanks they need and deserve. My daughter recently went into teaching in a local elementary school. Capable, hard working, passionate and knowing how to relate to people she looked forward to a successful career. All was well until a month into the school year when as a first year teacher she may, or may not, have given a bit too much homework. A mother posted a complaint on the class' parent body group chat, another responded in kind and within a day a well liked teacher was turned into mince meat. Mothers, you want good teachers for your child? Support them. That doesn't mean you cant voice a complaint or suggestion. That does mean you have to voice complimentary feedback as well and nip negative 'hock' at the bud.

Anonymous November 30, 2021

I feel everyone should do what works for them. If you get your degree in special education and work for a school you can get paid decent. I recommend a Jewish college like Touro request separate classes, Sara Schenirer or Raizel Right. You can work under the board of ed in a Jewish school as a provider. You can be a literacy teacher, with that masters program and get compensated via an agency. There are many options. For Jewish schools, I would honestly recommend as many of them ALL TOGETHER to team up to request funds from the mayor, senators, councilmen, anyone influential with fairly compensating teachers and tuition reduction. Presenting influential letters from rabbis to the government with a lot of prayer should help. The right contacts have to be made. That to me, is the answer. We can start this initiative under the direction of rabbis with Torah Umesorahs help and then start advertising that we need to work on this project. We have to mention to them that the students quality of education isn't what it should be and this is affecting their future. WE NEED YOUR HELP! In turn, all the funds the government invests will be repaid tenfold by having students being given great educational opportunities and that will positively affect society.

Anonymous November 30, 2021

I went into chinuch because I love teaching. When my school couldnt pay me, and even told me to ask my parents for help, I went to work for the public school system. Now, years later, I am still owed over 50,000 dollars in back pay.

R.S. November 29, 2021

Over 40 years ago I decided not to go into teaching and went into computers instead. I wanted to support a husband. We moved out of town after a few years in kollel, where I was able to be a full-time stay-at-home mother. When my children were all in school, I started teaching. I had no cheshek to go back into the corporate world, especially when I spoke to and saw my friends who were working in offices. I love teaching. I love the children and parents and it is one of the most gratifying jobs ever. Yes it is very hard but there are many perks. I have friends who are in business who are struggling. BH the city that I live in is so incredible ... they really take care of the mechanchim. True my husband's Rebbe salary is much higher than mine and yes we live simply and make do with less...yes teaching can be hard, there are some parents who can be really difficult and yes sometimes it takes over my life but I have seen such bracha in my life. I was told that if one takes care of Hashem's children He will take care of yours and He does. Parnassah is in the eibeshters hands. It's scary how many talented girls are using their kochos for chinuch habanos. As a community our gashmius level and standards have sky rocketed ...something got to give. Kudos to organizations like chasdei lev and to schools who give bonuses to teachers and rabbeim. It adds so much chashivus to teaching.

Anonymous November 28, 2021

The system is broken on so many levels. My son was so meduyak on what he was looking for. He knew he needed to be supported (Israel forever! learning indefinitely) and he wouldnt even consider a girl who was in chinuch (being practical although very Yeshivish). Fast forward two years later and now that job advancement courses are necessary it is now my SON who needs to shoulder the majority of the child rearing activities as well as miss seder or come late should something go awry. This system of mommy works in a "real job" is taking a toll on our sons as well as our daughters. That's not to say he can't pitch in. Of course he does, but the learning no longer takes kadima to her work/school etc. I don't know if going back to teaching would be the answer for my DIL, but I'm just expressing my frustration with the system.

Anonymous November 28, 2021

As a Rebbe and a parent I must point out a double standard that seems to be part of this conversation. On the one hand we want our schools to have everything for our children, with every possibility for growth, yet we are not willing to pay the price of private schooling. We complain about our lower salaries, but we demand that our children receive greater scholarships as staff's children. We complain about our workload, but are not willing to be part of the solution. We have the shortest annual work cycle in society, but would like to be paid a full annual salary. Yet, the summer months are ours to work a second job in camp. How many of us have small extra incomes in our communities, against the wording of our full-time contracts?! On the other hand. We are paid prices that are all too similar to Uber drivers and fast-food servers. We work the long hours after school for no extra pay, but are expected to promote the school. Not one of us is doing this for money, but for the love of our students and the passion for knowledge. A smile of a child can carry me miles through the day, but not one step through a cash register. A tense, aggravated, frustrated parent is the price our children have to pay for your children to have a Rebbe?! It hurts that we have to make a choice, but at the moment it seems to be the junction we are at.

Anonymous November 28, 2021

I am so proud to be a teacher! I love my job and can never imagine myself doing anything else. I am so lucky to be surrounded by yiddishe girls and frum teachers all day long. I watch my friends who are in other professions and I see that the excitement and passion that I have for the yiddishkeit I give over is something they simply can't relate to. Even girls who come from good homes struggle to keep their fire alive. Its just a different life. I will not say that I never worry about how I will make do with such a salary but I daven to Hashem all the time. I ask him to understand how much I love my job and to help me be able to continue in this field.

Anonymous November 25, 2021

Burned out teachers need to step aside. The problem is that after 15 years in the job, many times there are no other alternatives for parnassa. So they just continue teaching. But without the fire, without the care, and real passion, our children are suffering. Especially in these challenging times when kids need all the love and warmth that they can get.

Anonymous November 25, 2021

When I was in BJJ (many years ago), my teaching methodology instructor told me after my model lesson, "You are a born teacher. You MUST go into teaching!" I did so for a short while, before I got married. But I wanted a husband who would learn long-term, and he was very suited for such, very l'sheim shomayim, an unusual masmid who LOVED to learn full time. We realized we couldn't make it financially, and my husband's learning was more important to me than an opportunity to utilize my natural teaching talents. So I took an office job. We still struggled on one salary, but nearly as much as if I would've gone into teaching. As a teacher, in my situation, I would've drowned long ago, financially speaking, which also effects many other aspects of marital life. It wasn't even an option.

Anonymous November 25, 2021

As a Limudei Kodesh teacher, I would definitely benefit from a higher salary! But after reading everyones' comments, I just want to remind everyone that all parnassa is from Hashem, for real! It's not either office or no money. It's all from Him! You do what is right for you and if you put full trust in Hashem, He will take care. Join this attitude!!

Anonymous November 25, 2021

As a retired shadchan I am seeing another crisis taking place. I remember just a few years back a mother of sons would not consider a resume of a girl who went to school or worked in an office. The mothers of boys only wanted teachers for their sons. Currently most mothers of boys will discard any resume of a girl who teaches and will ONLY consider a girl who is in school or working in an office or has a career. There is something to be said for teachers who are surrounded by a Torahdike environment. No matter how 'frum' an office is, it does not hold a candle to the sviva of a classroom.

Anonymous November 25, 2021

My daughter who is very passionate about being a teacher has to work at four jobs in chinuch to make ends meet. She has three children under the age of four. She comes home to preparation, test marking, and phone conferences with parents. How I wish she would be compensated appropriately.

Anonymous November 25, 2021

I want to call attention to one aspect that is often not discussed. Schools only pay teachers for Yom Tov if the teacher was present on the day prior to and following that vacation. Which means that if a teacher's (meager) six weeks are up on Erev Yom Tov, she loses pay for the whole yom tov, UNLESS she decides to come in to teach the last day before school closes for yom tov - before the six weeks are up. This means that our Moros feel pressure to come back to school postpartum and erev yom tov, haggard and sleep-deprived, just so they can be paid for the week or so while the SCHOOL IS CLOSED ANYWAY! If we can't work out a paid maternity leave for teachers (which would be ideal), can we have a heart and allow our teachers to be paid over yom tov if they are on maternity leave?

Anonymous November 24, 2021

I love teaching, it's in my family for generations and I feel like I am impacting generations. However!! The amount of hours that are spent marking/preparing etc. do not allow for any other job. I think we should start a Chasdei Lev for Moros. We stand in front of the classroom in oxidized wigs and sometimes outdated clothing and worrying how to afford our kids shoes/uniforms/tights without holes. This financial burden adds tremendous stress, and children who feel nebby / can't have what their friends have resent having a mother who is a teacher. I think if there was a program to provide sheitels, clothing, shoes and the other necessities for a frum family, this financial support and feeling of appreciation would make it much easier for teachers to stay in chinuch long term. We need experienced teachers!

Gavriel Wachsman November 24, 2021

I'm a Rebbe in Toronto and come from a family steeped in Chinuch. I encourage my daughters to follow their dreams and become Moros / teachers and while they were single taught full days at the local Bais Yaakov Elementary and High School. B"H they were very matzliach and made lifelong lasting impressions on their talmidos. However, after marriage, in order to support their husbands in Kollel, they had no choice but to leave their dreams and face reality. The office jobs pay double and they arrive home with no additional workloads. My oldest daughter is still able to teach in the afternoon as her school in Brooklyn pays reasonably well and she supplements her salary with freelance graphic design work. To summarize- this is a big loss to our future Bnos Yisroel.

Anonymous November 24, 2021

I used to teach, and I now work in an office. Before sukkos and pesach, the school would distribute coupons to local stores. The last Pesach I taught, I needed a new shabbos robe. Despite the 10% off coupon, I didn't have the remaining $130 to pay for it. At the same time, my pediatrician prescribed medication for my baby that wasn't covered by insurance. It cost $40 out of pocket, and I couldn't afford it. Shortly thereafter I was offered a job for the same number of hours a week, at double the salary. No experience was required. Teaching was no longer viable, so I had to leave the field.

Anonymous November 23, 2021

If we are training our daughters from a young age that they need college degrees, by definition we are not training them for idealism. Meanwhile, we are struggling with overeducated girls who can't find their bashert and who are overqualified to be teachers. I believe that the Moetzes should put a moratorium on any discussion of what girls 'want to be when they grow up' until twelfth grade. (Currently, in many or most schools, it begins in kindergarten, continues with job fairs in middle school and pressure for college preparedness). At least let's even the playing field of options in a girl's mind. At this point, teaching is not even one of the career ideas offered to students. Only degreed career choices are suggested. We need to have a little bit more vision and clarity in our long term goals for chinuch habanos.Much hatzlacha.

Anonymous November 23, 2021

I am a limudei kodesh elementary teacher and feel extremely taken advantage of and burned out! We are expected to come in for meetings, to set up classrooms, to come into school for PTA without getting paid! This is besides for the AT LEAST 10 HOURS a week that I mark and prepare at home without getting paid! And I won't even mention my salary that started below 8.5k. Thank you for bringing this awareness because I don't know how long I will still be interested in this position with these conditions.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

This is not a new issue, and any experieinced adminstrator is well aware of it . Nor is it easily solved. As noted by Chazal (Yerushalmi Shekalim), there are plenty of donors to for buildings, whether with name recognition (deservely so), or from various grants from non-profits and government agencies, but there is much less funding for operating expenses, including salaries. Aside from the issue should we be paying teachers more, there are many schools (thankfully less than in prior years), where salaries are not always paid on time. There are institutions where male teachers are paid more than female teachers for the same hours and effort. This issue has been going on for decades (Rav Schwab raised it many years ago, as well as Dr. Kamentsky Ztl) My high school age daughter, who would love to teach, requested my input. I responded I cannot responsibly advise her to make a career of teaching, rather she shoudl do it as a side job to fulfill her ambition, as she would like to marry someone who will be in Kollel, and there will be bills to be paid, and children who will need to be fed and clothed. The pheonomon of Jewish education for every Jewish child is an American invention, and therefore even when there is no money available, we insist on a Jewish education. Each generation has its challenges, and as noted by a prior commentator, staffing issues, particularly for girls schools, are a recent problem. Part of the solution lies in raising the level of respect for teachers, both by parents and adminstrators, and investing in continuing education, similar to the business world. Many businesses offer low cost continuing education - why are our teachers any worse? When a young woman graduates seminary, is that the end of her training? Professional development days are a good start, but teachers need the guidance of a seasoned principal, which often is the difference between a good school and great one. There is plenty of support available, both financial and moral for those who are struggling in school. If we invested in better outcomes for all of our students, not just the struggling ones, perhaps we can acheive a better return on the investment.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

Schools are in a bind. There is the tuition crisis. Every year tuition goes up, often more than inflation. Parents are rightfully being asked to give more and more of their paycheck to pay for school. Somehow though, with all the tuition increases, teachers salaries have not kept up with inflation. If 20 years ago, a starting teacher made 15,000, in 2020, starting teachers would need to make $22,500 for it to be a comparable job. But the salaries have not kept pace. Teachers have to beg for a $300 raise here or a 1% raise there when food prices, clothes prices, and even tuition increases at a much faster rate. So essentially, teachers salaries have gone down and tuition is going up. A school's main business is educating students. The money is not going to the teachers. So maybe we need to ask whether we are budgeting correctly and whether the priorities we have set for our schools are correct. Tuitions have gone up so much but we don't pay teachers comparably to what we paid them 20 years ago. We may need to pare back on some of the activities, assistants, guidance couselors, amenities, new buildings and administrators to be able to afford better teachers in the classroom.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

I have been teaching kodesh for over 25 years. I really love what I do. The schedule has enabled me to be home for my children and I enjoy that I have a vacation in the summer. It is unfortunate that I can easily say I am able to teach and enjoy my profession because my husband is NOT in klei kodesh. Ironically, I could never have continued teaching had he not gone to work. Teaching has become a luxury few can afford. The biggest problem I have encountered lies in the salary cap that exists when you teach in a Bais Yaakov. I recently found an old pay stub from 2006. My salary has grown approximately 10k in the past 15 years on regular teaching raises while my husband's has increased by 10 times as much on regular raises for his occupation! One of my daughters who actually teaches, just got a job outside our community and is earning the same salary I do. Another of my daughters is in special education, where she earns equivalent to my salary with 1/4 of the homework and a very flexible schedule to boot. I find it demeaning that a teacher is made to feel "money hungry" or at best not quite lishmah if she wants to be paid her worth. As my daughter in law says, teaching is an "altruistic profession"- It is, and we cannot be compensated for the level of time, effort, dedication and commitment to our students. I teach in a school that appreciates the dedication of their staff, but the time has come to bring our salaries up to par.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

i have been teaching for many years BH and enjoy what i do. However I can never understand that parents are always complaining when we have days off and never appreciate all the hard work that goes into educating their daughters. There seems to be no hakaras hatov for a morah while at the same time a rebbi is always shown monetary or extra benifits before a yom tov and is labeled the "bread winner"

Leah Moskovits November 22, 2021

Would I encourage someone I care about to enter the field of chinuch? Provided that said person is capable, passionate, able to do with less and work hard, my answer would be a resounding yes. Why? Because I'm a realist, and the reality is that the goal of a Bais Yaakov girl is to be the best Yiddishe Mame she possibly can be. Which other career provides an environment that acts as a natural springboard to catapult a mother into the atmosphere of whatever Yom Tov happens to be currently on the calendar? Which other career provides an ongoing connection to Torah, yehadus and parshas hashvua? Which other career's calendar is in absolute sync to your children's schedule, allowing you to be off when they are, and home in time to greet their busses? Which other career allows you to understand what makes children, and the yeshiva/school administration tick, so that you can better navigate your child's experiences both in school and at home? No matter what else is on my plate at any given time, I am forced to think of creative ways to get my students into the spirit of things and then easily bring the ideas and ruach home with me. Surrounded by young children's enthusiasm , by their simple emuna that Hashem is All Powerful, that He loves us and protects us, I can't help but feel the same. From a practical standpoint; I've been supporting my family through teaching for the past 27 years. Its possible. A teacher's start up salary may be below minimum wage - and that is a disgrace - but if one is successful there is room for growth. My classmates who started off working at other positions may have initially earned lots more, but the hours and yom tov schedule forced them to leave the workforce as their family grew. A friend who spent 3 years in nursing school, racking up significant student loans, and then spending 12 hour shifts away from her young children, made a simple mathematical calculation that made her reevaluate the practicality of her decision. She deducted the cost of her education, the loss of potential salary during the year at college, and the higher tax rate that comes along with a nurse's salary, from an estimate of what she would earn over a 20-year nursing career. The total was not very different from what she would potentially earn working 20 years as a 9-5 bartender at Starbucks. A college degree's earning potential often sounds more glamorous than it is. As a teacher I was able to supplement my salary by working summers, running an erev pesach school etc. All opportunities that would not be present at a 12-month-a-year job. Yes, I need to take advantage of government programs, as well as teacher's discounts for school, camp and seminary tuitions, but I accept them with pride as a means to be able to continue at my post without the embarrassment people who simply are struggling to make ends meet may feel. Do I work hard? Very. I ran a kitchen serving 800 people one summer. It didn't compare to the intensity of running a preschool classroom. Do I think teachers should be better compensated, be given the same benefits and salaries as Rebbeim, be provided with insurance and pensions? Absolutely. Would I give it up? I hope I never have to. As an aside, no one discourages Chasanim from joining a Kollel because the stipend won't cover the cost of renting a one room apartment. And no one will deny the fact that it is the husbands job to provide. We all acknowledge the importance of learning and starting one's life steeped in Torah, and protected from the pull of the streets, and support kollel learning accordingly. Perhaps it is time for the community at large to value the importance of keeping our girls in an environment that is as sheltered from the outside world as can possibly be, and supports her connection to Yiddishkeit, and work together to make being a Morah financially feasible.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

As a prominent teacher in my community for the past 11 years, I'm so happy and excited about this FINALLY being discussed. I've worked so hard all these years, calling parents, PTA, juggling multiple responsibilities and setting an example in and out of the classroom. After 10 years of dedication in Bais Yaakov, I was only making 20K. I loved my job, but I was thinking of leaving. I only have boys and it just didn't pay for me to stay, when my entire salary was going directly to my boys school. (Why can't boys tuitions be given off for working in girls schools? Let's keep our talented staff where they are and make some adjustments.) I really wanted to make it work and stay. I asked my boss for a 5K raise. That's it! He asked the board, and I was told no. Keep in mind, this school has a tremendous budget, but can't pay one of their best teachers an extra $5,000 after 10 years of work? So I left, and a 19 year old sub took my place a few days before school started because they were so desperate. We need to come up with a better system.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

I have been teaching limudei kodesh for 30 years bh and hope to continue as long as I can. I live and breathe my students, feel incredibly lucky to be part of shalsheles hamesorah. There is NOTHING compared to making a difference in the life of a child and guiding him/her in our precious mesorah. Not only is my salary a joke, it actually goes down each year bc health insurance rises and my paycheck doesn't. My friend's daughter is a make up artist and pulls in more than ten thousand dollars a month in cash. A first year teacher asked me recently why I teach, she's leaving at the end of the year. 1. teachers need a liveable wage or we chalila won't be left with any. 2. we need to stop looking down at teachers. I frequently get asked disdainfully why I'm still doing this years later. I ignore the negativity but this is a common attitude. 3. most parents can't pay more tuition but spend more on summer camp, flowers, photography, tablescapes, etc.. The level of living has gone up tremendously, teacher salaries haven't. 4. When I started at 18, parents respected us and help us to great esteem. Recently I witnessed a 30 yr old parent yell at my 75 yr old talmid chacham principal bc she was unhappy the school gave off for veterans day (teachers had workshops). 5. I would never be able to do what I do if I had to live on my salary. However, the important thing to remember is that parnassa comes from HKBH, not a bassar vadam and He is the one I turn to.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

I was teaching for several years after seminary, and doing Graphic Design on the side. Baruch Hashem, I was blessed with certain teaching skills that my students, school, and class parents were crazy over. When I got married and moved, I decided this is ridiculous- spending tons of after hours time, getting paid minimally, and having no benefits, no maternity leave pay, and no appreciation. What for? I decided to get a full time Design job to make it worth my while. In short, I missed teaching so much so I'm back in the classroom and making a difference. How long will this last? I don't know

Anonymous November 22, 2021

I must admit that I do not understand most of the comments here. I teach fifth grade math in a regular Bais Yaakov, and... *My starting salary was nearly double the cited norm. *The teachers are paid on time. Always. *The pay schedule is 12 months, not 10. *There is a built-in 2% raise every year. *The school gives bonuses and/or gifts before every single yom tov. *There are two weeks (not six, admittedly) of paid maternity leave.\r\n*The teachers are given incredible administrative support. *Not including my first year of teaching (when I definitely WAS drowning in lesson plans constantly), I have only three total weekly hours of after-school work most weeks. The bulk of my lessons, worksheets, etc. were already created in my first year of teaching; I spend only an hour or so each week refreshing my plans and coming up with new creative ways to present my lessons; and I do a lot of in-class grading with the girls, leaving me to only look over already-graded work and write comments - for sure my grading doesn't take me more than two hours or so per week most of the time, and I have a LOT of students.\r\n*Outside of parent-teacher conferences, welcome phone calls, and sporadic situations, I rarely find myself needing to reach out to parents more than a few times a month, and they rarely reach out to me more than a few times a month as well. Help me understand what is going on here. My school, and my school only, and my job, and my job only, is so exclusively amazing and checks off nearly every box that the other commenters in this forum are complaining about? How is it possible that my experience teaching in the school system has been so drastically different from everyone else's??? Because when I consider my job, I feel lucky. I work part-time on a family-friendly schedule with almost NO take-home work, have fast days, chol hamoed, and summers off but am still paid like clockwork throughout, I earn a salary that is very much commensurate with any professional part-time position, have two weeks of paid vacation every year while my office-employed friends need to use theirs in order not to work on chol hamoed or erev yom tov, I can easily earn more than my office-employed peers if I take any kind of relaxed morning job and work in the summers... and I have the tremendous zechus of - yes, even as a limudei chol teacher! - having a beautiful impact upon yiddishe neshamos every single day. I really don't see the crisis here. In fact, I am left wondering why so many girls AREN'T becoming teachers anymore! (And okay, so Rebbeim earn more than we do. Rebbeim also start earlier than we do, end later than we do, work on Sundays unlike us, and continue teaching through half the summer unlike us, and teach BOYS, who are A LOT harder to teach than girls...)

Anonymous November 22, 2021

The problem is that schools are offering to first time teachers a really low starting rate and if you try hard you can shlep it up to a dollar or two more. It\'s the norm. Why should a school offer more if they can offer less? Just kidding. They should. I heard of a girl who is getting married soon, teaching mid-elementary, and getting paid 13$ an hour. That\'s around what cleaning ladies get. It doesn\'t even make sense. Thank you for raising this important topic.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

B"H I do not rely on my salary to live day to day, but with supporting several married children, my salary is not just an extra. Many of my colleagues are in dire financial situations and they are barely eking by. In addition, it is very very difficult to find serious young girls who are Chinuch minded. They want to support spouses that are sitting and learning - as they have been guided all their lives- and a teaching salary just won't cut it. Salaries must be raised and askant must see this as much of a priority as supporting boys mosdos. Our girls are our future and we need quality role models.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

As an Executive Director in a Bais Yaakov High School, I can identify with all the stakeholders in this important discussion. My full thoughts are beyond the scope of a blurb on this website, but to try to encapsulate the issue at hand, we can talk about solutions, but like many things in life, nothing will change unless forced to. Up until this year, schools did not have issues finding staff. Why should schools compensate staff more? Is it fair to go back to parents to pay more tuition while failing to apply the rule of supply and demand? Donors? Starting this year, (at least in my area), schools faced issues properly staffing the classrooms. I have seen this as a parent as well as an Executive Director. However, this has been an issue across the board, from administrative assistants to cleaning help to teachers. This is a problem facing the overall market, not just the education field. In addition, the question of pay rate has not helped the staffing for this year. Compensation rates were not the issue finding staff for this year. In terms of teachers' pay rates, most of my teaching staff gets paid at least $2,000 per period for the year. What that means in layman's terms is if they give a 40 minute class once a week, they make at least $2,000 for the year. Do the math on that, the lowest a teacher makes is over $90 per hour of classroom teaching. This rate is a higher hourly rate than both the top Principal and myself! Add in the ability to work over the summer or on the side, which full time plus salaried workers do not have, and they have the ability to make decent wages. If one chooses to teach 9a-11:50a four days a week, they can make $32,000 starting, with a half day job, and Friday, Summer, Yuntif and school vacations off. If one is trying to work those hours but still make a full time salary, please realize the problem is not that salaries are low, but that the expectations are high. As reflected in the many comments, many of the teachers love teaching and there are certain benefits that come along with it. We can focus on the negative, such as lack of retirement or health benefits, or focus on the positive, such as QTR benefits and working in a frum environment. I personally do not get retirement or health benefits from my position, but my wife who works for the City does. Together, we make life decisions, such as careers or jobs together and choose what works for us, as a couple and family. I would hope that others do the same instead of making choices that they regret later. To approach parents and ask for higher tuition, when I am not forced to (read: I can get proper staffing in the classroom), seems hashkafically incorrect. I ask them to deal with us in a professional and respectful manner and I attempt to hold myself to the same standard as well. To put the onus on me, to fundraise, is somewhat fair. It is part of the achrayus of running a mosad, and I do not take it lightly. However, there has to be proper return on investment. We have a dinner campaign as well as smaller fundraising throughout the year. Unfortunately, we are seemingly maxed out vis-a-vis the community and their tzedaka dollars. Do I wish that the community took more achrayus for the local mosdos? 100%. Do I think I can change them? No. Do I wish that I could pay teachers more? 100%. Do I think it is responsible? Before this year, no. Now? Maybe. Do I think that raising tuition is an option? Not unless I can honestly tell the parents that all other options have been exhausted. As a school, we try to show appreciation. Unfortunately, I can not recognize individuals the same way the business world can. Treat an employee to dinner? Business world- "Wow! She really earned it with the time she put into that deal." Chinuch world- "Wow! That's nice. I know the girls love her and she helps out, but I also extend myself." If I could make every employee happier with $200 of gifts ($50 to the bagel store, $75 pizza etc) throughout the year, I would jump at it. However, it just becomes expected and while we do give something close to Rosh Hashana, Pesach and Shavuos, these also seem to be expected at this point. To sum it all up, teaching has maalos and chesronos; it is all about how you look at it. In terms of raising compensation, unless market forces cause the system to change, I do not see change happening anytime soon.

Golda Antokol November 22, 2021

Yeshivas and Bais Yaakov's can offer sign on bonuses i.e. $5,000 to new teachers and Rebbeim they feel will be outstanding for the talmidim/talmidos to attract the best talent to consider a career in chinuch.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

I absolutely agree, 100 percent.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

The issue is of great importance. I am involved in administration of a school and I am fully aware of the problem and it's implications. Sadly the fact is that most parents are struggling to meet their tuition obligations - and even those obligations do not cover the cost of that child in school. If there is a way to get the donors to create a fund that would help the teachers with their major expenses (Pesach and chasunas for example) that would be a great help. Please note that teachers (as well as Rebbes) get intangible benefits that are of great worth which they would not get at a job: 1) Full pay for Yomim Tovim 2) Days off to prepare for Yomim Tovim 3) No issues with coming home late Erev Shabbos 4) Reduced tuitions 5) Working in a frum and pleasant environment 6) And the most important of all - a sense of accomplishment. Those working in the offices get none of the above. Yet the above benefits don't pay bills, some form of increased salary is in order even if it is not comparable to working in an office, but don't look to the parents to carry that increased burden as it won't happen.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

I started teaching high school four years ago and I absolutely love it. I teach now in three high schools and there is very little that can compare to the satisfaction of bringing about a change or growth in the life of a teen. I actually work to inspire others in my position who do not need to work to support their families but have what to give a classroom to pursue a teaching career. I do however, have a hard time with the thought of my young daughters pursuing a teaching job as a main career. The salary is not commensurate with other fields they may choose and my daughters are capable talented and bright. I do hope they take a job that will allow them to teach a few periods a week so they can experience the sipuk of teaching but again only as a side job. I don't know what can be done or if anything can be done, but when I read the comments submitted by so many other teachers that really aren't making ends meet financially it causes me genuine pain. There is nothing more precious than giving over to the next generation. But it is a luxury.......

YS November 22, 2021

More than a decade ago, when the challenges of technology were gaining attention, a massive effort was undertaken to develop awareness of the issue. The response was the organization known as TAG, which now has branches worldwide, and has been at the forefront of saving Klal Yisroel from the digital destruction being wrought. I am grateful that Torah Umesorah is bringing attention to this crisis in Chinuch Habanos, which has long been swept under the carpet. Thought provoking advertisements in frum media can bring further awareness to this issue. In response, I envision a national organization founded to launch a sweeping campaign to supplement the salaries of girls schools. It can be known as Keren Sarah Schneirer, as it would be dedicated to perpetuating and enabling the continuity of what she started a century ago. Perhaps our Kehillah's renowned ba'alei tzedakah, who have already given so much to Klal Yisroel, will recognize the crucial importance of this effort and underwrite the initial donations to launch the campaign. Dedicated askonim, with guidance of the gedolim, can build out the framework for how this organization will allocate resources. I am confident that Klal Yisroel will step up to the plate.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

I recently changed careers and entered the educational field. Prior to that time I was an engineer. When the school asked for my salary requirements, they made a comment surrounding my asking for more money then some of their senior teachers who have been teaching for 40 years! To me the reason is simple math. A teacher from 40 years ago paid approximately 1/30 - 1/40 for their house as I would have to pay today for mine. I would be very happy with a salary 30 times what those teachers were paid when they started. As the cost of living has skyrocketed, my current salary today as a full time teacher has a fraction of the buying power that salaries for teachers had 30 - 40 years ago.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

I teach in several girls' high schools and the lack of benefits is appalling. Never mind 401K or health insurance, I do not even qualify for disability insurance when I have a baby. I juggle 4 jobs to cover the bare essentials. I look at the help wanted ads all the time. I have a college degree and can easily be making over 100k a year. With a growing family, even raising the salaries will not be enough to cover the costs of a frum family today.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

This is a situation that unfortunately has been very many years in the making. I have been teaching Kodesh for four decades. I love it, I am good at it, and Baruch HaShem we are not counting on my salary entirely to live. This is a huge piece of the yishuv hadaas that I have and can bring into the classroom. I work in a school that values professional development. That is why I can't understand why the last relic of the past century is that Moros make so much less than Rebbeim and many of the "perks" of the Rebbeim are not available to the Moros. I resent people making suppositions about my husband's income- and they do!- especially since he is in Klei Kodesh as well, just not in my school. I want nothing more than to support him (as I did when we first got married) when he eventually retires, but honestly I could not do that on my salary. I do also feel that veteran teachers are not appreciated, certainly not by administrators that are half their age.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

My husband is in kashrus and I teach. When our daughters started shidduchim and the other side or shadchan, wanted to know how much support we would give we were stuck. We could barely manage our own expenses. There is no way we could do that.The shadchanim were quite strong in putting us down for that. Although we are both in klei kodesh it did not seem to matter. So although I have three daughters who would love to teach I told them they can't. One of them actually taught HS part time while taking her computer courses and was excellent! However, they need to be able to support themselves and their husband that is learning. I suspect that most of the girls that are passionate about teaching have parents who are teachers. These parents can't afford to support their young marrieds, and therefore ironically are telling their children not to go into teaching. There is a lot of HW for teachers and although I love teaching, I don't have the extra money needed to make things easier so that I have the time to spend on all the work. As a side point, neither I nor my husband get pensions. Since I am part time I don't get any benefits! I I don't get Yom Tov paid, as I am paid for the exact number of days that I teach. I get the same amount of days (really periods) off, the past 15 years. Nothing has changed. Like I and my co-teachers joke, the make up lady for the chasuna gets paid $100 and upwards per face (about 45 min) and we get...? That tells us very clearly what is valued.... I feel bad that I can't help my married children financially. It would be nice if things would change.

parent of of seminary daughter November 22, 2021

My daughter was recently preparing to give a 30 minute model lesson in a school as part of her seminary program. she spent hours upon hours preparing for this staying up until 3:30 AM and she said to me "why would i go into teaching if in a office i could just walk straight into work without any prior preparation"

Anonymous November 22, 2021

The title no doubt caught your attention, because no one should be insinuating that our moros aren't the greatest people around. Our moros certainly are the greatest people around, and we must salute their tireless devotion to being mechanech our b'nos yisroel. Our beis yaakovs are putting out fabulous girls who are inspired and ready to create and build their own homes with conviction, confidence and yiras shomayim. Until “recently”, aspiring to become a morah to pass on the torch to the next generation, was a most noble ambition. In fact, our whole seminary industry was built on the premise that our high school graduates wanted to train as teachers. The very names of many of the seminaries are or were called Teachers seminaries. The girls were given another year to hear lessons from the best of the best. They were inculcated with the passion of yiddishkeit, and were taught methodology in teaching. They were also infused with the pride of marrying and supporting a husband in learning, and what it means to be moser nefesh for such a commitment. This system has been tremendously successful, so much so that I feel that it might be the cause of one of our biggest soon to be failures. The best of our talent pool who had the creativity, passion, patience and love for Torah, yiddishkeit and children became our moros. Their classrooms were alive and our daughters drank in everything that they had to teach. The salary was never great, but a woman’s position was rarely about the salary anyway. However, the more we realized that our system was not viable financially with our men in kollel and our women being morahs, something had to be done. Over the last fifteen years or so, our 'system' has been encouraging our girls to pursue degrees in order to provide a respectable income to help support a husband in kollel. Before feminism became popular, it was completely acceptable in the world at large to pay a woman employee half of what the same employee would earn if it was a male. This is not to say that our Rabbeim are being paid what they should be, because they are certainly not. Be it as it may, the sad reality is that our talented girls who have so much to offer the next generation in terms of passion, love and excitement for Torah yiddishkeit, with the necessary creativity are opting to put their energies into their professional goals. Because it has become completely acceptable and noble for our girls to pursue degrees for their financial benefits, there are very few girls who are choosing to enter the chinuch field for real. There are plenty of girls who after seminary will take a teaching position for various reasons, and many of them are doing a fantastic job. We all know however, that our hopes for them are to get married, settle down and help support a family. Often times, these same girls are also taking classes towards their degree. Being that there is very little hope for a respectable salary being a morah, most of these girls do not stay in this field. There is such a quick turnover with single girls being morahs, that some schools will not even hire single girls to be lead teachers. The sad reality is that our young daughters starting out in Bais yaakov who are thirsting for inspiration, and would benefit tremendously from our young women who were successful in the same system, are not connecting. There are very few women who despite the paltry salary are choosing to teach. The most important job of the Jewish people is to teach and inspire the next generation, and there are getting fewer and fewer women who are stepping up to the plate to do it. Not because they don't want to, rather because our system still allows for our moros to be paid such a negligible salary. A salary that might cover to pay two babysitters with some change left over, and that's about it. Why would any mother with a growing family agree to commit to taking charge of a class of girls, with everything that it entails, and bring home such a small salary. Having to be in the classroom by 8:30 or 9:00 means a whirlwind of a morning, often with multiple drop offs beforehand to various babysitters, baruch Hashem. This profession also requires late nights after the kids are sleeping to be a great morah. While it used to be just fine to make 'nothing' being a morah because very few women did, in today's world, this is no longer the case. It is true that a morah's official teaching hours are short, and her day is 'over' while many in the professional world are still at work, please remember that a morah's job doesn't end for the day when she walks out of the classroom. There are papers to grade, sheets and lessons to prepare, and parents to speak with. We are asking our morahs to be thinking about her class literally around the clock. Yes, moros are off during chol hamoed and in the summer, but please remember that you will never know how many extra 'unpaid' hours were put in to prepare your daughters for Yom tov and for the school year as a whole. There are very few if any perks in This World for a morah to make it more attractive or lucrative. I am not looking to follow the secular world in pushing for salary equality per say. Nevertheless, we mustn't ignore the reality of the current situation. A morah today is being paid a fraction of what our girls are looking to make, and are being encouraged to make. Had we left things to Hashem, and not actively encouraged our girls to pursue degrees, we would be in a very different position. The fact that "the system" has been pushing our girls to get good paying positions, makes a morah position very unattractive. We must find a way to improve the image and attractiveness of being a Morah. While money was never a factor in chinuch habonim or banos, to choose to ignore that our current lives very much revolve around money and salaries would be ignoring the hard facts. We must take a hard look inwardly, and ask ourselves how we can attract more of our talented young women to step up to the plate and help educate the next generation of our daughters. How we can get more great talent to join our great moros. Our daughters are too important to our continuity to leave them without having the best morahs available!

Anonymous November 22, 2021

I am a principal in a chassidic school and have taught and worked with children for over 30 years. I’m embarrassed to say that the starting salary for a first year teacher in our mosdos is $850 a month! These young girls are idealistic, enthusiastic, and passionate and they spend an enormous amount of time being trained. After hours they juggle with preparing curriculum, worksheets and tests. They spend hours marking those tests and writings and communicating with parents. Even the most talented ones are dealing with behavior management or with students who struggle with learning disabilities. Needless to say, I have a tremendous amount of turnover each year as they get engaged and married and are forced to seek a job that makes sense. It’s not hyperbole when I say that I have some teachers earning a grand total of $20k after 7 years of teaching. While my school is to be commended for paying on time, I dread the thought of the yearly salary negotiations that await me around Pesach time.

Anonymous November 22, 2021

I have been a teacher for 12 years and my twin sister went into a different field. One of the biggest differences I see is not the salary, is the benefits and perks and shows of appreciation. My sister gets insurance, pension, a 3% raise every year, a bonus in the winter, paid maternity leave, gifts and letters of appreciation when she closes a deal, gifts for each yom tov... I sometimes imagine how different I would feel if for every yom tov my school would give me a gift (along with a personal letter recognizing my work preparing our precious children for yom tov). What if the teachers were treated to a dinner at a restaurant on the schools credit card? What if the school would send me and my husband to a hotel for a night after a particularly challenging semester? What if my principal would recognize my struggles and compliment my years of commitment to the "firm" and then hand me a bonus check?What if I got a 3% raise without feeling like I'm asking a huge favor? What if we treated teachers like valuable employees? What a difference this would make to our children!

Anonymous November 22, 2021

I taught for five years. I loved my students. I loved the classroom. After two years of marriage, I had a decision to make. It was either me leaving the classroom, or my husband leaving Kollel. I chose to join an office.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I'd like to encourage my daughter who dreams of teaching. I am afraid to, because she wants a learning boy. Unfortunately, We are not in position to help. I have heard that good learning boys aren't interested in girls teaching for that reason.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I taught preschool for 20 years, and I'm ridiculously passionate about giving our kinder the best start in learning. I just finally left for a different field. Why? Because almost no one understands and values what a preschool Morah does. I got very little support from the school administration and board. Here's how it works: All teachers are undervalued and underpaid. Moros are paid less and valued less than rebbeim. General studies teachers are paid less and valued less than limudei kodesh teachers. And all the way at the bottom of the totem pole, you'll find preschool teachers. We believe in what we do and love what we do, and we have to find our own chizuk. We have to remind ourselves that we are not "glorified babysitters", that we make a difference and that our work has a lasting impact on our students. Cuz no one else cares. Eventually, I just had to move on. Please, Torah Umesorah, teach our boards and principals (maybe at your upcoming convention?) what it means to have and value and hold onto your passionate and experienced early childhood educators.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I\'m a young teacher. I\'ve only been teaching for a few years but I absolutely love it. I love giving, I love teaching, I love my students. This is me. Each year, however, when I sign my contract for the upcoming year, my heart is heavy, full of doubt. Why am I signing this? Why am I starting off my life financially unstable? How many people ask me the question of how I plan to support my family? My friends who have office jobs make more than I do, with 2 teaching jobs, and that\'s their starting salary. And yes, it\'s a 24/7 job, counting the thoughts, time and preparation put in. Every day, I think about the future, how much longer will I hold this out? Every year, I think to myself, this is the year I need to start a different job, but I\'m not yet ready to give up nurturing these precious neshamos. Perhaps it will be this coming year, but one thing is for sure, as much as I love and live this life as a Morah, I will probably have to switch to a more lucrative field some time in the near future.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I have 2 daughters teaching limudei kodesh, both very successful b\"h. I have another daughter graduating this year school. I can not see her going into this field. It\'s painful as a father to see my daughters struggling to pay there bills while working so hard. They invest so many extra unpaid hours, and for the few hours a day that they are actually paid, the pay is the lowest pay in the community, plus the pay check is often late. They don\'t get maternity leave pay, they don\'t get even the full month pay only 4 weeks a month (the reasoning is they get paid for yom tov). While the mossad charges the parents 12 months tuition, the teachers get paid only 10 months. THE SYSTEM HAS TO CHANGE. Thanks Torah Umsora for bringing up this important issue.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

As I wrote previously I do enjoy teaching very much. As I am getting older I am worried that once I leave teaching (hopefully not too soon) there is no pension in the schools. That is something that really should be worked on.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I have been teaching high school language arts in the same school for the past 18 years. I chose to stay here even though other schools pay more, because the school is like a family and there is safety and security in this familiar place. This year there was some turmoil in our school and several faculty members and teachers were asked to vacate their positions without any explanation, pension or severance pay. So I asked for a raise, claiming that this job is no longer a cozy, comfy and secure place. I was offered a 50 cent per hour raise which came out to a total of $5 per week, and felt more like a slap in the face than a raise in salary. I am considered a good teacher and I am told that I am valued as such, but the pay scale is not commensurate with the time and expertise that is expected of a teacher to post-corona teenagers. No, I would not suggest any girl who wants to support a family go into the chinuch field unless schools appreciate and pay teachers honorable salaries.

YESODOS November 21, 2021

To all the educators. Keep you head high, be proud, feel good about yourself, you're super special because you're working directly for the Rebono Shel Olam. You're educating HIS children. TU is there for you and will hopefully come up with solution how to make your job more manageable

Suri Cohen November 21, 2021

I taught for close to 25 years before doing a stint in Jewish journalism. After writing a book, I was ready to move on to the next thing. Teaching is my passion and my first love. In an ideal world, I would naturally head back to the classroom. But as everyone has already said, the math just doesn't add up. And it's not only that. I was a star teacher, but the salary that is not commensurate with my abilities and experience just reeks of disrespect. Not from any one individual or institution, of course. But it seems that for all the great strides we've made since Sarah Schenirer's time, in a sense, chinuch habanos is still an afterthought in the communal worldview. Why does a starting rebbe automatically make more than a morah with decades of experience? Why do the children of rebbes automatically get free tution, while no such thought is entertained for the children of moros? Then, of course, there's the phenomenon of bnei Torah families only considering degreed girls as shidduchim for their sons. The perfect storm of disincentives for talented girls to invest in our daughters. There is so much money in our communities. Money for weddings, for ever-ascending standards of dress and housing, for exotic vacations. The vast majority of these gvirim are good and responsible people. There has to be a paradigm shift that puts chinuch habanos on the front burner of our communal consciousness.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

A group of balabatim in my city recently gave every single Rebbe a 10K raise and foot the bill! What a magnificent example they have set for others who recognize that the future of our people depend on Rebbeim and Moros.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

Approximately 25 years ago I wrote an article to be printed in the Jewish Observer about raising salaries of lady teachers-breadwinners. The article didn't get printed because then everything was about Rebbeim. At least it got me a $1000 raise from my principal! I enjoy teaching and wouldn't give it up for anything but I did encourage my daughters to get degrees. They all went into special ed and are making the same money for a starting salary as I am teaching many years!

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I have been teaching for over 30 years and can not imagine feeling satisfaction in any other field. The joy that I have in walking into my classroom every day, watching the lightbulb turn on in my young students is priceless. But, the system is broken in too many ways. The difference in salary for men and women is vast. What other professional field gives such a low salary increase yearly? It is very hard to feel professional, to go the extra mile for your students, spend the extra time preparing a new lesson, when financially you are feeling choked and to add to that you are emotionally not feeling appreciated. In more recent years I have noticed how parents do more complaining than complementing. They expect the teacher to be there for their child 100%, when they themselves are not. Something has to change fast. We are loosing many talented girls to other fields.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

As a teacher with a few years of experience in Early Childhood Education as well as Middle and High School Education, I can safely say that I love my job (s) but I don't see how long I can honestly make them work for. Baruch Hashem, right now, we are making ends meet with my salary, however, I do not have children who are in school yet. I think that rather making the parents pay more, which would not be possible, we need to provide benefits to Moros in our communities. Teachers should receive free tuition to any TU school in their area, they should be paid for 12 months of the year, Maternity leave as well and be provided with family Health Insurance as well. It's not feasible to be paid such a small salary and expected to cover all expenses with 0 benefits from our employers. It's just not fair.

MD November 21, 2021

I've seen a comment that a Rebbe/Teacher isn't a full-time job. For the most part this is simply NOT TRUE at all. In today's world teachers deal with many very complex situations and expectations coming from all sides. Take the average office worker and check him out at about 1:00 afternoon and you won't find him nearly as wiped out as the teacher, and if you do - chances are he's getting a big salary and comfortable conditions.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I am so happy that this topic is being addressed. I am an English teacher and am married to a Rebbe. Recently, my daughter overheard me telling an aspiring educator to look into alternate careers because of the financial burden incurred when entering the field of chinuch. She was shocked and asked me why I would discourage someone else from going into chinuch when that is what she sees both of her parents doing. However, she does not know of how difficult it is to stay in this field with a large family and the high expectations of the oilam in terms of gashmiyus. People are often shocked to hear of how many children we have in how few rooms or that we do not send a bunch of children to camp in the summer. We are not making ends meet and we are still expected to pay for many expenses in our own classrooms, like prizes or certain supplies. Plus, every night, we have to be in touch with parents and constantly thinking about how to improve our classrooms or better reach a student. I do not know what the answer is but I do know that I, in all good conscience, can not encourage young people to go into chinuch when asked.

YESODOS November 21, 2021

One of the resons the crisis is happening now is because we all got stimulus funds and people are getting funds that are sometimes more then they were making by teaching .

YESODOS November 21, 2021

Our educators need to be today besides a teacher. They need to act as a father, mother, therapist, and all other "ist" Whether we appreciate it or not parents need to recognize it.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

Thank-you so much for addressing this. This is hard question with an even harder answer. I am teaching for 10+ years and BH have seen much success. I enjoy teaching, giving over the Mesorah, and walk into my classroom every day with a spring in my step. But honestly, it is getting harder and harder. My family is BH growing and my paycheck doesn't even cover my rent. It is gone by the first of the month and the rest of the month is a struggle. Why am I struggling like this? I am a talented and creative person that can make double in any other field. Even though I think teaching is the greatest thing, unless it becomes more practical and feasible, I cannot confidently recommend going into this field. Life is just too expensive and with a salary like that, it is nearly impossible.

Chani Richmond November 21, 2021

The title of "Rebbe" is still a symbol respect in most frum communities. A Morah is not considered on the same caliber. No songs have been written or organizations created to support the Morah financially or emotionally. Add to that the pressure put on girls to "support their husbands in learning", and the probability of young girls going into Chinuch as a profession becomes little to none. Our daughters are already suffering greatly from the lack of good Moros. The older generation of Moros are getting older. Our Bais Yaakov's have to do something immediately to solve this crisis!

Anonymous November 21, 2021

In the olden times, there was a community tax, tzedaka collection that included all community affairs.

YESODOS November 21, 2021

Increasing tuition may not be the smart answer. The schools need to come up with smart and creative way to raise money. Just adding to the wages to where it should be is also not feasible. We need intelligent minds to think out of the box.

YESODOS November 21, 2021

There are many aspects that need to be talked about. 1 big topic is retirement. The status quo of Chodesh Lashono does not do justice.

YESODOS November 21, 2021

Multiple schools couldn't fill positions In the beginning of the year. This is finally getting the attention it deserves Thank you TU

Anonymous November 21, 2021

Just a few things to note: Office jobs may pay more, but they are often 9-5 at work, and there is plenty of take home work and expectations to be available, answer emails etc. Workers are also expected to be available for 12 months, with some vacation days that they can use for yomim tovim etc. As much as teachers prepare, after the first year, they need to review material so they know it, but it does not require the same amount of overtime as that initial year. As one teacher stated, the hourly rate is not that bad... Raising tuition would hurt more than help, as most parents cannot afford to pay the full amount anyway. Perhaps if schools arranged for summer programs, parents could save some of the "camp" and contribute more toward teacher salaries. For teachers to complain that they need to work a second job, either after their regular work hours or during the summer, causes those of us who work full time to resent their complaints, since working these "extras" would be equivalent to full time office work and the teachers pay would likely be similar at that point.

YESODOS November 21, 2021

This issue is across the board. By the boys Rabaim, English teachers, and by the girls. Our mechanchim are not appreciated today as once was. They are not valued by us and by effect don't value themselves. There are multiple reasons and factors why a new young person would not consider going into this special field. There is the financial aspect of it. They are not looked up to. They feel like 2nd class citizens. We need to change the attitude towards them and figure out a way that they feel that the school they work for will give them some sort of life long financial security at a minimum. Our mechanchim and machanchos give away their life for our children. They are preparing our children for their future. We need to recognize it, protect them, believe in them. When that happens our young and upcoming rabbaim and teachers will much easier decide that this godly work is something they want to give away their life for. There is so much to say.....

Anonymous November 21, 2021

Unfortunately, I also left the classroom, as I couldn't afford to be a teacher. It's a shame, as teaching is my life... However, teaching is something you need to be rich enough to afford. It's crazy to think that my Kochos are going into non-jewish children... but you can't compare the salary of a BCBA to a teacher.... I forbid my daughter from becoming a teacher as well. I told her -it's for the rich. Which is so so sad...

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I've been in Chinuch for 47 years now. My husband is in Chinuch. I encourage my children who are suited for it to choose Chinuch, because I strongly believe that there is no better way to live one's life. As far as parnasah is concerned, the Eibishter has always come through for us despite some "this just isn't working" times. So building bitachon is a side benefit of chinuch. However, I can understand why girls do not want to enter chinuch. Yes, it's the money. It's demoralizing to be paid practically minimum wage (the same or less than cleaning ladies) for a job that ought to be respected and viewed on a pedestal, and it's scary for a young girl to envision a future of supporting a husband when the numbers just don't add up. But it's not just that. Even more is the attitude that parents and baalabatim have towards chinuch. It seems that as mosdos have attempted to learn efficient running principles from the business world (not a bad thing on its own,) the business world has begun to view the mosdos as simply a service industry that must please its customer base - i.e. the parents and the students. While it's true that chinuch will only work with excitement, love and simcha, the love and simcha are the means to Chinuch, not the goal of Chinuch. The (sometimes impossible) demands made of mechanchim and mechanchos are formidable and keep increasing. Again, with ongoing training and experience we learn that in the realm of success in Chinuch we need to rely on tefillah and bitachon as well, but even for very idealistic young girls who are contemplating the future with their eyes open, it's quite daunting. Of course there is a shortage that will only get worse unless something drastic is done. Just making it lucrative is important but not enough.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

Many girls want to teach when they finish seminary regardless of the salary. However they know that they will have to leave when they get amrried. This makes it hard for them to truly invest in preparing a curriculum knowing that they may never use it again.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

My heart goes out to the Moros , mechanchim and mechanchos. No - do not come up with discount groceries and subsidized camps. Give them the salary comparable to what they could've gotten at a job of their caliber - if they would have gotten a degree and a great paying job that could "support their husband in kollel and family". PLUS more for their overtime since they're not working only 9 - 12 or 1 - 4, or even 9 -4 but as mentioned and recognized, more hours for preparation etc. I actually know a Rebbe who got paid $60,000 a year, over 12 months, for a 9 - 12:30 job plus night seder INCLUDING all the bein hazmanim and midwinter vacations; that showed appreciation and recognition, b/c he had to actually work all afternoon to prepare for those morning and night classes. I don't know if all rebbeim get paid like that, and if they do, great, or maybe they should get more, again, comparative to a job they "could have gotten", and same - moros / mechanchos should be getting the same kind of respect and pay, corresponding to both the actual times in and out of school AND to what they put into every child. We need to raise the chashivus of this field - and the reality is that the chashivus is in the pay. First anyways. I read a comment from a tuition payer - and as someone who paid tution, I understand the concern, but am not sure that it means "more tuition", I think it means better fiscal planning, or ... Wishing hatzlocha bracha and siyata dishmaya to all of klal yisroel for the sake of the children. And for the sake of the children, it needs to be the cream of the crop teachers, not the ones "who can't get a job anywhere else", teachers who value the power of the spoken word. The people at the top need to wake up faster than fast, as I just heard recently that they're so busy paying a lot to woo in the new teachers, that they're forgetting their best veterans, the best teachers, who are ready to walk out because they're not getting the credit, the support - and the payment - they really deserve - and the newbies, freshies are "getting everything because of desperation". Wake up before it's too late even more....

Anonymous November 21, 2021

There is another side to this morah-salary conversation that I feel must be addressed as well. It is indeed extremely necessary for our limudei kodesh moros to receive significant salary increases, and soon; however, our limudei chol teachers are struggling just as much as their morning counterparts. It is critical for quality Bais Yaakov role models to be financially motivated to teach limudei chol too: Right now, less and less of our daughters are pursuing such positions, painting a bleak picture of a rapidly-approaching future in which schools will be forced to look elsewhere for limudei chol teachers and make less-than-ideal decisions about just how much it matters who stands in front of and influences the minds and hearts of bnos yisroel for hours every afternoon.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I've been in chinuch for close to 30 years- it's my passion and in my blood-however one cannot ignore the challenges that come along with it. It's a 24/7 job. Our Talmidos are part of us even after leaving ( high) school- seminary, shidduchim etc. they become part of our extended family. Sometimes they'll need a listening ear years down the line. We're always there. That's the way it should be. I know this discussion is about higher salaries, and I agree with all that's been said. I'd like to add one more aspect. Even if you're not in the position to contribute financially, there is something you can do to make a difference in the teacher's life. To prevent that burn out. I'm talking about expressing your appreciation. It doesn't take much time or money, but it goes a long way. Send a nice note, a small gift, flowers, a book, dinner on a test night, a gift certificate to pamper her. Not just the parents! Many do that already. But so many schools don't. SHOW the teachers how much they mean to you. Thank you

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I am B"H in my 8th year teaching, married with several young children. Since I started teaching, I have worked full-time as a Limudei Kodesh teacher in Modern Orthodox day schools. I teach 2 classes, morning and afternoon, which enables me to be a full-time teacher. Reading these articles has been incredibly painful as I see what my fellow teachers are doing for a fraction of what I am paid. In the schools I've worked at, my salary has been approximately $50K with benefits, including health insurance. (Part of the reason I am able to receive that amount is because I have a master's degree [in Jewish education].). I was able to support my husband learning in kollel for 6 years, and over the last two years as our family has grown, he has shifted into klei kodesh with some time to learn as well. I was fortunate as a child, growing up in the Modern Orthodox school system, to have Torah-true role models as my moros growing up. Those teachers shaped my future as a bas Yisroel and an eim b'Yisroel. It is my zechus and pride to serve that role as a Torah-true morah to the next generation. My administrators have appreciated what I bring to the students and to the school, and recognize that it is hard to find qualified, professional, and Torah-driven educators. I am shaken by the idea that my daughters may not have the opportunity to learn from incredible moros the way I did. Perhaps I should consider switching gears and teaching in my daughters' Bais Yaakov to give them - and my community's daugthers - what I think I have to offer. What's stopping me? My biggest concerns are in the area of finances and influence. With the loss in salary, will my husband need to work more instead of learn? Will we be able to afford our bills, while we are already on a very low budget? In terms of influence, will my current school be able to find other Torah-true teachers? Who will be their role models?

Anonymous November 21, 2021

As the daughter of a rebbe who struggled literally to put food on the table, I have pushed my sons- who certainly have the ability to effectively transmit Torah to our next generation- to pursue other professional profitable careers. I have had to explain that teaching with passion is the purview of the rich. Something needs to happen- but as a full paying tuition parent - I recognize that the middle class parent body is stretched thin- and change will have to come from other sources.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I and many of my friends share the same feelings. We so badly hope and wish to teach but are told by our parents, teachers, and rabbanim that we need to look for other options. So we teach as long as we're single while going to college for something else far less interesting that utilizes far less of our talents, yet counts as reasonable hishtadlus to support the husbands we daven for. We are willing to live with less, our only question is if will we be able to live at all. And unfortunately we're being told not.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I would never advise someone I care about to go into teaching in our world. I minored in education for my undergrad degree but don\'t use it. The pay is too low, there isn't enough recognition, and the work goes far beyond the classroom walls. Our responsibilities pile up very quickly at a young age and I saw I'd never have the energy to invest in students while raising young children. I'm now in law school and advise others to choose something they love that pays well so they can cope with the responsibilities we're lucky to have as frum women.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

With schools only paying 10 months, backed up with last year still, at this point I feel stuck. This is where I invested into a career and I can't continue this way. Thank you for spreading awareness and for taking initiative.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

Teaching is unsustainable. I'm doing it for 5 years and reaching my dead-end point very soon. No paid maternity leave, no 12 month salary, and actually only 4 weeks per month salary, and the money arrives past the 15th. I'm married, with kids, and I'm still significantly below 25k.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

I have been teaching for over 30 years. A comparable FIRST YEAR Rebbe in my community (gr. 1-5) is making more money than I am now, after all these years! (A Rebbe in such a job works 10 hours more/week than I do.) Tuition breaks are helpful, however at my stage I don't have children in the school where I teach. Maybe if you're in chinuch, you should get free tuition in ANY TU school. I don't know, but there has to be some way to balance out the salaries. Many of us Morahs are breadwinners. Besides, I think that the job we do is worth much more than what we get paid! We have to balance students, curricula, superiors, parents, paperwork, etc. Also, because parents pay tuition, some (not most) of them think they "own" you - like when they pay for their cleaning help - they think they're also your boss! Teaching requires enormous focus to think about and help each child - especially after hours! It's not the kind of job that generally lends itself to full time in-school hours, especially if you have little children at home. I also think that anyone who is not in chinuch does not really understand what we do and what it takes to do it. I am grateful to Hashem every minute that I am able to teach. May He give us all the koach and the means to do His work properly.

Devora Katz November 21, 2021

I love teaching and have been teaching for 6 years but I have set up a side business which I hope to make full time when I get married so that my husband can stay in Kollel. The other reason I think that its hard to get teachers is because as the schools become more parent run the teachers are getting less support because the principals need to keep the parents happy.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

A practical solution - Teachers should receive a tuition reduction of 100% (this is in addition to the low paying salary) This would then increase the actual value of what the teachers are making monetarily. If this is the case it can really help solve the problem, because then so many mothers with a passion to teach and with children in the school would be interested in working in their kids' schools. You would have an influx of teachers. From my understanding, Rabbeim receive 100% reduction and teachers merely get a reduction. Both are incredible positions and a person can unlock a child's potential. I strongly urge Torah U'Mesorah to encourage schools to put this into practice immediately. It would help on so many levels.

Anonymous November 21, 2021

Teaching is a great hobby, and it's fulfilling and rewarding, however if you want to live normally you still need a second and sometimes third real job.

L.G. November 20, 2021

I started teaching straight out of seminary. It took me a few years to find my footing and have confidence in what I was teaching and how I was managing my classroom. Although going into teaching I was aware it is not quite a high paying job, I nevertheless was unprepared for the full time demands a teaching job requires. And while salary per hour may not be terrible it's all the extra hours- phone calls to parents, creating worksheets, grading papers, planning lessons, PTA and extra expenses- projects, incentives, supplies- that school doesn't necessarily pay for... that make me rethink my decision constantly. How long can I continue teaching for? I'm not sure. As long as I can, I do love what I'm doing, although often overworked and underappreciated. After that? No chance of sacrificing my family's needs for a job that just doesn't cover the bills. And while I know that I'm not irreplaceable, I think school administrations should seriously consider the future of their teachers they may be losing soon if something isn't done about it.

MR November 20, 2021

I'm not teaching to get rich. But I invest so much into my students not just during school hours. The job never really ends. The compensation, however, doesn't add up. Unless schools increase their salaries, I wouldn't encourage anyone to follow in my path. Let them go into a field where they will be appreciated....

Anonymous November 20, 2021

Thank you for bringing this urgent topic to the limelight! I hope something will change for the better!

Steven A Kopstick November 20, 2021

When I hear discussions discussing increases in salary that sounds to me like its a call to increase tuition. As a full tuition paying parent I say NO with a capital N and a capital O. Making ends meet for parents is hard enough with current tuition levels. Everything must be done to keep expenses flat. The easy answer is to increase tuition. The harder choice may be to use technology or have teachers teach one class in the morning and one in the afternoon. As unideal as it is to have some children learn limuduei kodesh in the afternoon desperate times call for desperate measures. Raising tuition CAN NOT HAPPEN.

Anonymous November 20, 2021

While working in chinuch is beyond beautiful it's also beyond difficult. The achrayus I have, never ending preparations and talking with parents, the stress, the underpaid and overworked, the energy and concentration. Sometimes I feel I wanna stop it all, but on other good days I get beautiful smiles and kids that grow. I hope I can be the difference in their lives

Anonymous November 20, 2021

My daughter is a teacher. Actually, a star teacher. Her students, principal and parents are all so happy with her! Yet, with 3 little kids, she is barely making it! I am so passionate about her teaching, yet my husband and I are really pushing her to leave her job. It's just not doable!

Anonymous November 20, 2021

We are parents of students attending schools and yeshivas in Brooklyn. Like the vast majority of Parents in our schools, we pay full tuition. In our schools if you live a comfortable lifestyle (own a home, 1-2 cars, camp, cleaning help) then you cannot get a tuition break. And we agree with this as tuition is so important. We just can't understand how, if they have on average 30+ students in their classes, so little of that money is being given to the teachers, rebbeim, morahs. Aside from parents, teachers are the most important, influential people In our children's lives. They work hard during and after school hours. Why aren't they given more of the incoming money. I'd love to know where all the money is going that the schools can't afford to offer more so that amazing teachers can remain teachers and support themselves and their families respectably.

Anonymous November 18, 2021

I have the zechus of teaching in 4 classrooms. It's quite hard to remember what a tremendous zechus I have, when my salary is so degrading. I invest tremendous energy and Kochos into my students, and it's easy to reach frustration and burnout. That meager salary doesn't do any encouragement. It actually does the opposite. Every 15th of the month, I'm reminded that I better look for a better occupation. Yet, my love and passion for my students and teaching are still overweighing. I don't know how long that will last.

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